Analyzing a Centropa Film

Teachers use this activity for any project where students are asked to create a story on film or another visual presentation (Prezi, PowerPoint), including the Virtual Walking Tour project (students research the Jewish community in their town and create an online tour using Google Maps that others can take). The goal of this activity is to help students see how a story told in film is told through narrative, visuals and audio. Students watch a short Centropa personal story film three times, each time focusing on one aspect of the film-making. Teachers have told us this useful activity helps their students think about how they want to tell their own stories through film.

Related Films

Kurt Brodmann -- The Story of the Brodmann Family

Kurt Brodmann tells the story of his family: how his father Leopold, an actor, fell in love with Franzi Goldstaub, who was sitting in the audience. Franzi came from an orthodox family and her parents would not let her marry an actor.
Because he was so much in love, Leopold gave up his acting career and went into business.

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Jozsef Faludi -- An Orthodox Childhood

Jozsef, who attended both a religious and a secular school as a child, paints for us a picture of growing up in the bustling, small Jewish community of the small Hungarian town of Kiskoros. His father, an orthodox Jew, served in the First World War and had a small leather goods shop.

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Katarina Loefflerova "The Importance Of A Good Vacation"

Katarina's story shows us what middle-class life looked like in interwar Czechoslovakia with a fascinating collection of snapshots taken in sports clubs and Jewish day schools, skiing in the Tatra mountains, swimming in Lake Balaton and water skiing on the coast of Dalmatia.

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Ernest Galpert -- Growing Up Religious

The story of a Hasidic childhood in one of the centers of Orthodox and Hasidic Judaism of Central Europe. Mukacevo (as it's called in Czech, or Munkacs in Hungarian) is a town that was in five countries between 1918 and 1991: the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, interwar Czechoslovakia, wartime Hungary, the Soviet Union and today, Ukraine. Mukacevo had a majority Jewish population (before it was wiped out during the Holocaust); its great rabbinical courts feuded constantly with each other.

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