Tibor Grosz, Erzsebet Radvaner's first husband

Tibor Grosz, Erzsebet Radvaner's first husband
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  • Photo taken in:
    Budapest
    Year when photo was taken:
    1896
    Country name at time of photo:
    Austria-Hungary, pre 1918
    Country name today:
    Hungary
This is my first husband Tibor Grosz as a little boy in 1896 in Budapest. We were always laughing on this photo because he looks like as a beautiful girl, by the way he was a beautiful man! Tibor was born in 1894, in Budapest. He was fourteen years my senior. We had no wedding at the synagogue. He was not non-religious, but he said that it was nobody's business what two people did. Once we went to the synagogue on Dohany Street at Yom Kippur. Even then I was disturbed by all the talking going on. I go there either to pray or to discuss things. I never felt like going. He was a chemical engineer. First he was in the leather factory. It went bankrupt. Then for a year he was unemployed and then he became the head of the laboratory of the Leipziger Spirit factory. We lived in Obuda. We had no phone, and after 11 at night there were no trams. Our guests had to walk to Budapest from there and everybody left at one or two o'clock in the morning, because they felt so good. In our flat we didn't talk about politics. Then came that particular Friday evening. We were leaving my mother-in-law's place and people were shouting that Vienna was under attack. With that, politics came. We moved to Katona Jozsef Street in 1938.

Interview details

Interviewee: Erzsebet Radvaner
Interviewer:
Dora Sardi
Month of interview:
July
Year of interview:
2001
Budapest, Hungary

KEY PERSON

Tibor Grosz
Year of birth:
1894
City of birth:
Budapest
Country name at time of birth:
Hungary
Year of death:
1945
City of death:
Bozsok
Country of death:
Hungary
Died where:
Bozsok
Occupation
before WW II:
Technician/engineer

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