Vera Farkas’ first husband in a forced labor camp

My first husband in forced labor.

[In 1943] the news spread that girls would be taken, but women would not. I had a sweetheart, and we got married quickly.

He was a Jewish boy, but we had only a civil wedding. He got a week furlough - he was in forced labor at the time - then he was taken away.

He was called Laszlo Schwartz, then he became Laszlo Solyom in 1949. He was born in 1921, and was from Pest. He learnt tailoring, but he couldn't get anywhere with it.

Vera’s first husband with his forced labor brigade

My first husband in forced labor. [In 1943] the news spread that girls would be taken, but women would not.

I had a sweetheart, and we got married quickly. He was a Jewish boy, but we had only a civil wedding. He got a week furlough - he was in forced labor at the time - then he was taken away.

He was called Laszlo Schwartz, then he became Laszlo Solyom in 1949. He was born in 1921, and was from Pest. He learnt tailoring, but he couldn't get anywhere with it.

Vera’s first husband in forced labor

My first husband in forced labor.

[In 1943] the news spread that girls would be taken, but women would not. I had a sweetheart, and we got married quickly. He was a Jewish boy, but we had only a civil wedding.

He got a week furlough - he was in forced labor at the time - then he was taken away. He was called Laszlo Schwartz, then he became Laszlo Solyom in 1949.

A postcard sent by Herman Beitner from Lwow to Palestine during World War II

This is a postcard sent from Lwow to Palestine by my father, Herman Beitner.

At the beginning of the Nazi occupation we ran away with my brother and Father to Lwow. Father is writing in Yiddish to his brother, Jakub, in Palestine. There's a stamp: 'Palestine, pass by censor' and next to it: 'USSR.'

I don't know what Father is writing about, I don't know the Yiddish language. [According to a translation from Yiddish:

Postcard sent by Heniek Oksenhendler from Lwow to Palestine during World War II

I spent the first few months of World War II in Lwow. At first I'd call the situation dramatic.

There were lots of refugees from Poland. People were unhappy, wandered around Lwow not knowing what to do with themselves. There were no means for living.

Mina Schif with her family was also in Lwow. Mina's mother knitted some scarves and my brother took them to an arcade to sell them. I was living in a school dorm, because I was supposed to start going to school in Lwow.

Julian Gringras in Berezowica Wielka

This is a photograph of me in our house in Berezowica Wielka near Tarnopol. My wife and I lived there in 1940 and 1941. This photo was taken in 1941.

After finishing my studies in Lwow I got a job in this enterprise Kavkaz Energomontazh, which I clung to throughout the war.

After that job in Lwow they sent me to Tarnopol, not to the town itself but to the village of Berezowica Wielka, a few kilometers from Tarnopol. And I think I worked there until the outbreak of war in 1941.

Julian Gringras and his wife Fela Baum in Lwow

This is a photo of me and my wife Fela Baum. It was taken in Lwow in 1940.

In 1940 I worked in Warkowicze but I intended to go to Lwow, because my wife’s brother Mosze, who had stopped off there and got straight into Lwow Polytechnic, was urging me to go to Lwow.

Lwow Polytechnic was a Polish polytechnic but by that time was under Ukrainian, i.e. Soviet authority.

Lilly Rosenberg at dance school

This picture was taken in Hetyen in 1935. It’s a dance school picture.

The town hall had a dance school. I’m in a white collar to the left of the one in the apron.

Before the deportations, I started to work, in 1942. In Beregszasz, I learned to tailor and I taught tailoring, because Uncle Samu, the exceptionally big Zionist, said, 'No diplomas, learn a trade, because in Israel that's what is important.'

So I learned a trade and continued to do it. The Jewish laws affected everything, our whole lives.

Erzsebet Rosenberg and friends

This photo was taken on an excursion to somewhere near Tiszakerecseny [village in Hungary], where there was a big forest in which we also had a plot.

We often made daytrips there with family and friends. The picture was taken in the 1930s. The man is Moric Grun, a lumber seller.

The girl on the far right is Magda Halasz, a teacher from Vari, a Jewish girl who converted to Christianity after the war, and graduated from the Law University.

Oldalak

Feliratkozás RSS - Ukraine csatornájára
glqxz9283 sfy39587stf02 mnesdcuix8
glqxz9283 sfy39587stf03 mnesdcuix8