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Janina Duda

He was connected with the supporters of Pilsudski, with Sanacja and also had PPS [22] roots. So his daughter, Wanda Lewicka, was accused of communism. So what this was all about, speaking in plain terms, harassing this Lewicki and his family.
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The caretaker, who sometimes came round, used to say to my mother, ‘Mrs. Perelmut, this cupboard is just like at Pilsudski’s [13]!
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jerzy pikielny

As soon as the Legions [5] were formed, Lolek, who was still underage, ran away to the army and so Grandpa went to look for him. He found him brushing horses in some unit. Lolek was a co-founder of the Polish scouting organization in Lodz. The troop was named after Tadeusz Kosciuszko [6] and Lolek was its scoutmaster. He probably served in the army in the 1920s.
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danuta mniewska

Let alone the fact when Marshal Pilsudski [4] died in 1935, there was massive national mourning - we all wore the black ribbons.
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henryk prajs

There were only three regiments of elite cavalry [the Chevaux-Legers] in Poland, the other two were the Jozef Pilsudski Regiment, stationed in Warsaw, and the Dwernicki Regiment in Stargard Gdanski. I was assigned to the regiment because I was an absolutely unblemished and loyal citizen, and I was not a member of any anti-Pilsudski [22] organizations.
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leon solowiejczyk

And also Pilsudski's death [11]. Everyone cried. There was this kind of 'trauer' [from Yiddish: sadness] at schools. I remember this song: '(...) you wear a dark robe, you are so dear to us, like a king in his majesty. On your name day, your holiday, you are so dear to us, Mr. President.' [Editor's note: a song for Jozef Pilsudski's name day, 19th March].
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Leon Glazer

And when it was Pilsudski's [4] name day there were always masses in the churches and in the synagogue. [In Catholic countries, name days are widely celebrated. The one for Jozef (Joseph), Pilsudski's first name, falls on 19th March.] And then Jews would come to the synagogue in Polish uniforms.
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And when it was Pilsudski's [4] name day there were always masses in the churches and in the synagogue. [In Catholic countries, name days are widely celebrated. The one for Jozef (Joseph), Pilsudski's first name, falls on 19th March.] And then Jews would come to the synagogue in Polish uniforms.
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henryk lewandowski

I remember the ceremonies after Pilsudski's death, they lasted several days. They transmitted it all on the radio, the burial Mass, transporting the body from Warsaw to Krakow, and later there was a newsreel devoted entirely to Pilsudski's death, I remember going to the cinema with Moniek, my youngest uncle [my mother's brother], it was overcrowded, we had to stand, I didn't see too much.
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Janina Wiener

On 3rd May [15] and 11th November [celebration of Poland’s independence, 1918] there were always street parades and the whole school had to attend. I don’t remember going on those parades in elementary school, but in high school we did. Obligatorily. I remember that when Pilsudski went to Madeira [Portuguese island in the Atlantic where Pilsudski took a vacation between December 1930 and March 1931], I was probably in elementary school. Each of the pupils had written a name-day greetings card that we then sent to Madeira [Pilsudski’s name day was 19th March]. There was a cult surrounding Pilsudski in elementary school and in high school, absolutely. Yes, [on the wall] there was the Polish eagle [national emblem], a portrait of Moscicki [Ignacy Moscicki, president of Poland 1926-1939], and a portrait of Pilsudski.
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My father’s political views… above all, he was an admirer of Pilsudski [12]. He was a fervent supporter of his, and Zionism didn’t prevent him at all from being so.
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Yes, when the Revolution broke out [1917], he forged his way back to Poland. On his own. I don’t know the details. Later, in Poland, he joined the Polish Army [On 11th November 1918, Jozef Pilsudski took command of the 30,000-strong Polish army. Within two months, he brought it up to 100,000]. He was in the Polish Army, but he never served in the [Polish] Legions [8].
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Estera Migdalska

I remember Pilsudski’s funeral [8], Pilsudski’s death. In fact, as far as Pilsudski is concerned, we knew a lot about him as children. He was a kind of hero for us, a moral authority. And I remember the funeral day in May 1935. Some ceremony was being held in the church, I stood at the fence, there was a crowd of people, and the mood was mournful.
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Feliks Nieznanowski

When Pilsudski died [in 1935], I saw him six times [on the catafalque in the St. John Cathedral in the Old Town] before a queue had accumulated, as it was close to home. Before Poland found out, I was already making the turn, as you went around the catafalque there. All kinds of events, if something was happening on Pilsudskiego Square, I was immediately there, say, a military band marching. I knew all the Legion [23] songs in Polish.
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There were celebrations on the 11th of November [19], on Marshal Pilsudski’s [20] birthday, all that you had in a normal school, plus Jewish holidays.
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