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Mico Alvo

There was a school on Aristotelous Square, the Alliance. Upon liberation this was the club of the gendarme officers, their association. Later, when they left, the arcade was built. [Editor's note: The interviewee is referring to the Hirsch arcade in which the offices of the Jewish Community of Thessaloniki are located today.] When the Community got compensation from the Germans - because the Community did get some compensation - there were two claims.

One claim was by the Alliance for the landed property there. The other one was from the Jews of Thessaloniki that stayed in Israel and never came back. They considered that since they were also from Thessaloniki they had the same rights. Finally, they got part of the compensation.
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Rafael Genis

My Constantia is the best helper in all community activities. On Sabbath and on holidays she cooks a treat for the whole community and the Jews join us in celebration. We chat and recollect family stories. We celebrate holidays according to the tradition. I feel under the weather lately and I have to look for a successor as I understand that I have heart trouble and had an operation recently. I hope that my successor will be Petras, who will come back to Lithuania and help me.
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According to the law on restitution we were given back the former premises of the prewar Jewish community. I sold that house and used the money to help poor Jews. Actually, the community is based in my house. I am the bookkeeper. I distribute the sponsors' aid coming from the Joint [18]. We celebrate Sabbath and Jewish holidays. I fulfilled my task: I put the monuments to the perished Jews on the places of their execution. I mostly used my savings for that as well as the money from the sponsors, collected by the relatives of the perished.
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Even though I was almost blind, I worked for many years. I retired in the early 1990s. Though since 1945 I have been getting a pension for the disabled, it is miserable. All those years my wife and I had been going to the places where Jews were executed to commemorate them. I thought of how to mark those places and put the monuments there. Besides, I couldn't feel indifferent towards those Jews, who survived the war, and now are scraping through. I decided to found a Jewish community in Telsiai and went to Vilnius to see the chairman of the United Jewish community of Lithuania, Alperavichus. He supported me. The community was founded in 1993 with me as a chairman.
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danuta mniewska

I don't know when he left there, but after the war he received compensation and with that money they were able to buy a piece of land in Israel.
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Daniel Bertram

And that woman deceived me, offering me help with formal matters connected with compensation [financial compensation for being sent to the Soviet Union and for the forced work there during the war].
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Leon Glazer

My daughter told me where in Warsaw it is, and there, in that Institute, I found the book that was in Bielsko in 1945, and my name. Why did I go to the Institute? Because I wanted to have some extra documents made out, because all I had were those about that Ruff guy, the SS-man, and I wanted them to count me a longer period for the compensation, because there I only had that period from the camps. That time, in the Institute, my daughter found out that they issue certificates for that compensation for the Polish- German Reconciliation Fund. And I got compensation. The highest that you could get. I split it all between the children.
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I had a problem with them including that camp period towards my pension in another respect too. They told me that forced labor was not a concentration camp. They had a list of all the concentration camps and they had it written down that Pustkow was not counted as a concentration camp. I appealed against that decision and later an explanation came that it had been included. That meant a higher pension, because otherwise I would have had a shorter period of work and less compensation.
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Aron Neuman

Einmal in der Woche gehe ich ins jüdische Alters-und Tagesheim, dem Maimonides-Zentrum. Dort sind viele alte Leute. Wir erzählen uns Witze, wir sprechen über Politik, über die Vergangenheit und werden dort gut betreut, haben Unterhaltung, Gesang, Tanz oder Gymnastik.

Zweimal im Jahr gehe ich in den Tempel, zu Rosch Haschana und zu Jom Kippur.
Einmal hat mich ein Bekannter zu ESRA [14] mitgenommen. Sie haben dort ein Interview mit mir gemacht und mich davon überzeugt, dass ich einen Antrag an die Claims Conference [15] stelle, weil ich einen Anspruch auf 250 Euro monatlich als Überlebender des Holocaust habe. Zuerst wollte ich diesen Antrag nicht stellen, ich brauche das Geld nicht unbedingt, und ich will nicht betteln. Im Dezember kam ein Brief aus New York, in dem sie mir mitteilten, dass mein Antrag einer von Tausende Anträgen ist und alle bearbeiten werden, ich muss Geduld haben. Aber eigentlich warte ich nur noch auf den Tod, so ist das, was kann man machen? Der Tod gehört zum Leben, und das Leben gehört zum Tod.
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sterreich ist eigentlich meine Heimat geworden. Ich habe in Österreich persönlich nie Antisemitismus erlebt. Ich benehme mich gut, und mich hat noch nie jemand angepöbelt, ich bin hier beliebt bei vielen Leuten, auch in dem Haus, in dem ich wohne.

Nach dem Tod meiner Frau war ich in Kattowitz. Ich traf einen Staatsanwalt, mit dem ich befreundet war, der hat mich bei sich aufgenommen und hat mich herumgeführt. Ich habe gesehen, wie verwahrlost es dort ist, und ich weiß, wie es einmal ausgesehen hat.

Einmal in der Woche gehe ich ins jüdische Alters-und Tagesheim, dem Maimonides-Zentrum. Dort sind viele alte Leute. Wir erzählen uns Witze, wir sprechen über Politik, über die Vergangenheit und werden dort gut betreut, haben Unterhaltung, Gesang, Tanz oder Gymnastik.

Zweimal im Jahr gehe ich in den Tempel, zu Rosch Haschana und zu Jom Kippur.
Einmal hat mich ein Bekannter zu ESRA [14] mitgenommen. Sie haben dort ein Interview mit mir gemacht und mich davon überzeugt, dass ich einen Antrag an die Claims Conference [15] stelle, weil ich einen Anspruch auf 250 Euro monatlich als Überlebender des Holocaust habe. Zuerst wollte ich diesen Antrag nicht stellen, ich brauche das Geld nicht unbedingt, und ich will nicht betteln. Im Dezember kam ein Brief aus New York, in dem sie mir mitteilten, dass mein Antrag einer von Tausende Anträgen ist und alle bearbeiten werden, ich muss Geduld haben. Aber eigentlich warte ich nur noch auf den Tod, so ist das, was kann man machen? Der Tod gehört zum Leben, und das Leben gehört zum Tod.
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Maurice Leon

I was never involved in Athens Jewish Community affairs, or in any other Jewish organization. On the contrary, my wife Yvette was fanatically involved in WIZO [39] and she still continues to be. I believe she is doing very well and I am supporting her with whatever she is involved with. [Editor's note: Mrs. Yvette Leon served for many years as president of the Greek Branch of WIZO.]

We never asked any compensation from any organization. We just once gave an interview to Spielberg's Foundation [40] on our life during the war, but I've never spoken again on how life used to be before the war in Thessaloniki.
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Fani Cojocariu

Not to mention I am a member of the Deportees Association [the Association of Romanian Jews Victims of the Holocaust], and that amounts to some support as well.
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Simon Meer

I was recruited in the army in 1949 and had to serve my military service. But they had issued an order: for those who had been deported, the forced labor they had performed during the deportation was to be counted as years of military service. And they counted my two years of deportation as my military service. And I managed to escape going to the army – the deportation saved me.
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Rifca Segal

As I am a beneficiary of the law 118 [Ed. note: Decree-law no. 118 passed on March 30, 1990 with regard to granting certain rights to the persons who were persecuted on political grounds by the dictatorship in force after March 6, 1945, as well as to those who were deported abroad or were taken prisoners (updated until April 19, 2002)]. The one regarding those who were relocated, deported.
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Jeni Blumenfeld

I received some money from a Mrs. Erica Goldner from Bnei Ibrit, an organization that helps Jews in Eastern Europe. First they sent some acts to the Jewish Community in Botosani – to those who lived during the Nazi period – which we filled in by saying that we were persecuted [during WWII], that we had to wear the yellow start etc.

They sent me three times every six months 180 euros. Now they don’t send anything. Maybe they will start again.
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