A camp postcard from Jozsef Rosenfeld

This is a standard army postcard sent from the Ukraine by my uncle Jozsef Rosenfeld to his wife Jolan, my mother's younger sister.

He was taken to forced labor there. On its back he wrote the following with a pencil: 'My sweetest! We have just arrived home by car and I'll quickly write some lines.

I know you will be happy to read it. I want to ask you something though, and this is a great sacrifice to me!

Because I want to ask you, it it's not too difficult for you, to send me weekly a few levente cigarettes in a letter.

Albert Tsessarskiy and his friends

This is me in the forest of Western Ukraine among the partisans in 1942.

I am the 2nd to the left in the bottom row.

The top row from left to right: the 3rd is medical assistant Masha Shatalova, medical assistant Anatoliy Rosenfeld is next to her, commissar Alexander Stekhov is next to him.

I remember the outbreak of war. I was on my way to the hostel from my sister's place.

I saw window wide open and listening to Molotov's speech when I was in the street: "War". I dashed to the hostel, where military enlistment office was located.

The Lwow Technical University

This is photo of the Lwow Technical University.

I lived nearby when I was child. This photo was taken after the war.

I lived on Na Bajkach Street with my mother, then we moved to another part of town, on Zielona Street, together with my mother, and there my mother died. And there the maid robbed us.

One day the maid took everything from the house, the rest of the furniture my father gave away to some warehouse for storage because it was before he remarried, and me he gave away to the judge's wife, because he was always on the move.

Matylda Wyszynska in Lwow after the war

This photo was taken after the war, when I visited Lwow

In March 1944, when the Soviets were already very close, at 2 AM the sawmill was evacuated.

It was a harsh winter, we roamed for eight days and eight nights and finally they took us across the San to Jaroslaw, a town ca. 100 km west of Lwow.

On the San I saw Polish navy-blue police for the first time in years, the Ukrainians had different uniforms.

When I saw the navy-blue policeman, I felt like giving him a kiss.

Matylda Wyszynska after WWII in Lwow

This photo was taken after the war, when I visited Lwow

In March 1944, when the Soviets were already very close, at 2 AM the sawmill was evacuated.

It was a harsh winter, we roamed for eight days and eight nights and finally they took us across the San to Jaroslaw, a town ca. 100 km west of Lwow.

On the San I saw Polish navy-blue police for the first time in years, the Ukrainians had different uniforms.

When I saw the navy-blue policeman, I felt like giving him a kiss.

Matylda Wyszynska as a secretary in a hospital

This photo was taken during the Soviet occupation of Lwow.

I studied in the Lwow Technical University , and I needed money.

The brother of my stepmother Lusia was a doctor, a director of hospital, and he employed me as a secretary.

Between 1939 and 1940 we were under the Soviets. And that wasn't normal.

My father lost his job, my uncle, Aunt Mia's husband, was arrested.

My second uncle, Ada's father, Aunt Regina's husband, also died in the Brygidki prison.

Matylda Wyszynska with friends

That’s me with my friends, I don’t know when this photo was taken.

In 1929 I went to a Polish school by the St. Mary Magdalene church. It was Catholic, but it also admitted Jewish girls.

There was a priest and an altar in the corridor, but Jewish students didn't have to pray. Nor did they have to attend religion classes, and they didn't.

The priest played with us, I have very nice memories of him, he was such a kind-hearted man, he played ring a ring o'roses with us and sleeping bear and all.

Matylda Wyszynska with her boyfriend Staszek Podhaniuk

This is me with my boyfriend Staszek.

I lived on Na Bajkach Street with my mother, then we moved to another part of town, on Zielona Street, together with my mother, and there my mother died.

And there the maid robbed us. One day the maid took everything from the house, the rest of the furniture my father gave away to some warehouse for storage because it was before he remarried, and me he gave away to the judge's wife, because he was always on the move.

It was a judge's widow who had a huge apartment near Leona Sapiehy Street, by Gleboka Street.

Matylda Wyszynska with her firends

This photo was taken in the Jezuicki Garden in Lwow. First from left sits Lina Kupfer, than me and first from right is Lusia Lewental.

I had four friends since elementary school; we were the five of us, as close as sisters.

We were all Jewish. We also had Polish friends but not that close.

One of us was called Mela Miezes. She had those thick braids, and one night one of her brothers cut off one of those.

During the war she changed her name to Melania Mirska and retained the name afterwards.

Matylda Wyszynska at the summer camp in Spala

This photo was made in 1938 on the summer camp in Spala.

This camp was organized by Military Training of Women; I was member of this oganization.

I had four friends since elementary school; we were the five of us, as close as sisters.

We were all Jewish. We also had Polish friends but not that close.

One of us was called Mela Miezes. She had those thick braids, and one night one of her brothers cut off one of those.

During the war she changed her name to Melania Mirska and retained the name afterwards.

Stránky

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