Languages: 
English

Vera Farkas with her mother’s family in Kallosemjen

Some members of my mother’s family in Kallosemjen. Maternal grandfather's name was Jakab Strausz, grandmother's name was Betti Weisz.

They lived in Kallosemjen. It was a typical Szabolcs county Hungarian village: a small, dirty village, with wooden fences. They [the Jews] didn't live separately, but there was quite a Jewish life, they came together in the synagogue.

The synagogue was very nice, and it was on the main square. There were quite a lot of Jews, and they came in from the neighboring farms. Just like my aunt and her husband.

Vera Farkas with her friends

This is me and my friends in the courtyard of our house. When I was six years old we moved to Buda and we lived in a big city building there, but we still lived in a one-and-a-half roomed apartment.
In the beginning my parents lived in quite bad financial conditions.

Then, later when my father was appointed departmental manager or deputy departmental manager in the Fenyves Department Store, we were better off. But we didn't live the life of the upper middle class.

Artur Strausz, Vera’s uncle with a friend

Artur, my mother’s brother. [He and two of his brothers] lived there with their parents [in Kallosemjen].

They passed themselves off as farmers, but they didn't actually do anything. Then they were deported [in 1944], they all died in Auschwitz.

Maternal grandfather's name was Jakab Strausz, grandmother's name was Betti Weisz. Their wedding was in 1843. They lived in Kallosemjen, this is in Szabolcs county, next to Nagykallo.

Artur Strausz, Vera’s uncle

Artur, my mother’s brother. [He and two of his brothers] lived there with their parents [in Kallosemjen].

They passed themselves off as farmers, but they didn't actually do anything. Then they were deported [in 1944], they all died in Auschwitz.

Maternal grandfather's name was Jakab Strausz, grandmother's name was Betti Weisz. Their wedding was in 1843. They lived in Kallosemjen, this is in Szabolcs county, next to Nagykallo.

Mihaly Strausz, Vera’s uncle

This is my uncle Mihaly [my mother’s brother]. [He and two of his brothers] lived there with their parents [in Kallosemjen].

They passed themselves off as farmers, but they didn't actually do anything. Then they were deported [in 1944], they all died in Auschwitz.

Maternal grandfather's name was Jakab Strausz, grandmother's name was Betti Weisz. Their wedding was in 1843. They lived in Kallosemjen, this is in Szabolcs county, next to Nagykallo.

Vera Farkas on vacation

This is somewhere in Visegrad [village in the touristic Curb of the Danube], I used to go there a lot.

There was some kind of a holiday home there, we would often go there with my family for a few days. My father always had a lot of friends there.

I liked going there because there was an open-air swimming pool there and we could play in the water. I remember that the men discussed separately among themselves, and the women chatted.

Miklos Farkas, Vera’s father photo on the registration form

My father was born in 1887. In 1904 he moved to Pest, and became a merchant's apprentice, and then he was sent to school from there, and he completed some kind of commercial course.

He began with textiles; he was in Kiraly Street at some sort of a textile merchant's, then he went elsewhere. At that time, at the beginning of the 1900s, working hours were from 7 in the morning until half past ten; he was exploited.

His life in the prewar times was not a characteristically Jewish life, but rather a worker's life. He joined the Social Democratic Party.

Vera Farkas with her cousins

This is my cousin [my father’s brother Adolf’s daughter] and her husband and me in Agard.

My father bought a little weekend house there. It was a tiny house, one room, veranda, small kitchen. It was called a semi-detached hosue because there were two identical yellow houses. One was ours, the other belonged to uncle Imre [father’s brother]. They were in the same courtyard.

My cousin Anna Farkas’s [father] Adolf became a timber-merchant, too. In 1919 he also did something as an agricultural something-or-other during the Commune [The brief Communist regime in 1919].

Miklos Farkas, Vera’s father in his workplace with colleagues

My father and his colleagues. In 1904 he moved to Pest, and became a merchant's apprentice, and then he was sent to school from there, and he completed some kind of commercial course.

He began with textiles; he was in Kiraly Street at some sort of a textile merchant's, then he went elsewhere. At that time, at the beginning of the 1900s, working hours were from 7 in the morning until half past ten; he was exploited.

His life in the prewar times was not a characteristically Jewish life, but rather a worker's life. He joined the Social Democratic Party.

الصفحات

اشترك ب RSS - Hungary
glqxz9283 sfy39587stf02 mnesdcuix8
glqxz9283 sfy39587stf03 mnesdcuix8